Thread: Cicada Season..

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  1. #1 Cicada Season.. 
    Grand Poobah Dropbear!'s Avatar
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    Went for a walk today and came across quite a few Cicadas molting.







    I love this time of year. Love the Noise of Cicadas. Beats the noise of towns any day.
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  2. #2  
    Grand Poobah Dropbear!'s Avatar
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    Cicadas (/sɪˈkɑːdə/ or /sɪˈkdə/), alternatively spelled as Cicala or Cicale, are insects in the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha (which was formerly included in the now invalid suborderHomoptera). Cicadas are in the superfamily Cicadoidea. Their eyes are prominent, though not especially large, and set wide apart on the anterior lateral corners of the frons. The wings are well-developed, with conspicuous veins; in some species the wing membranes are wholly transparent, whereas in many others the proximal parts of the wings are clouded or opaque and some have no significantly clear areas on their wings at all. About 2,500 species of cicada have been described, and many remain to be described. Cicadas live in temperate-to-tropical climates where they are among the most-widely recognized of all insects, mainly due to their large size and unique sound. Cicadas are often colloquially called locusts,[1] although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are various species of swarminggrasshopper. Cicadas are related to leafhoppers and spittlebugs.
    Cicadas are benign to humans under normal circumstances and do not bite or sting in a true sense, but may mistake a person's arm or other part of their body for a tree or plant limb and attempt to feed.[2]Cicadas have a long proboscis, under their head, which they insert into plant stems in order to feed on sap. It can be painful if they attempt to pierce a person's skin with it, but it is unlikely to cause other harm. It is unlikely to be a defensive reaction and is a rare occurrence. It usually only happens when they are allowed to rest on a person's body for an extended amount of time.
    Cicadas can cause damage to several cultivated crops, shrubs, and trees, mainly in the form of scarring left on tree branches while the females lay their eggs deep in branches.[3][4][5]
    Many people around the world regularly eat cicadas. They are known to have been eaten in Ancient Greece as well as China, Malaysia, Burma, Latin America, and the Congo.[6] Female cicadas are prized for being meatier.[6] Shells of cicadas are employed in the traditional medicines of China.[7]

    Cicadas live underground as nymphs for most of their lives, at depths ranging from about 30 centimetres (0.98 ft) down to 2.5 metres (8.2 ft). The nymphs feed on root juice and have strong front legs for digging.
    In the final nymphal instar, they construct an exit tunnel to the surface and emerge. They then molt (shed their skins) on a nearby plant for the last time and emerge as adults. The exuvia, or abandoned exoskeleton, remains, still clinging to the bark of trees.
    After mating, the female cuts slits into the bark of a twig, and into these she deposits her eggs. She may do so repeatedly, until she has laid several hundred eggs. When the eggs hatch, the newly hatchednymphs drop to the ground, where they burrow. Most cicadas go through a life cycle that lasts from two to five years. Some species have much longer life cycles, such as the North American genus,Magicicada, which has a number of distinct "broods" that go through either a 17-year or, in some parts of the world, a 13-year life cycle. These long life cycles perhaps developed as a response to predators, such as the cicada killer wasp and praying mantis.[19][20][21] A predator with a shorter life cycle of at least two years could not reliably prey upon the cicadas.[22]
    Credited to
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada
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  3. #3  
    auscraft
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    Great photos DB.
    I agree I love the sound they make listening to them now actually
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  4. #4  
    Gnome!
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    They are an interesting critter for sure and yes like the sounds from them and the occasional shower as one walks through a heavily wooded canopy trail Have had a few emerge here at home but not as many as you are no doubt getting there.

    Great pics there Drop. I like the ones as there coming out of their lava stage and transforming into their adult stage.
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  5. #5  
    HiCountryTom
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    Noisy bloody things..lol...Great photos mate...
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  6. #6  
    Grand Poobah Dropbear!'s Avatar
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    Ahh I love them. I am sitting here at the computer now listening to them
    Love them.
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